This is a collection of pieces of advice to make your everyday photos more enjoyable to look at; a little more with every post. These are only bits which do not claim to be complete, but are rather all you need to know at that moment.


I assume my readers are non-professionals who are interested in capturing their memories in the way they have experienced them, instead of how their camera device automatically suggests an output, thereby speaking of using anything from a mobile phone to an auto-set DSLR.

About the author: I am Mareen Fischinger, a professional photographer, living and working in Düsseldorf, Germany.

You are welcome to ask snpsht a question! (Please check your spelling...)
If you would like to submit posts to the site, you can do so via this form.
(Please note that I know nothing about certain camera models and do not see myself in a position to give any shopping advice.)

Anonymous asked: Hello, could you please tell me what is the best way to clean my dslr's lens? Should I use the same kind of cloth that I use to clean my glasses? or should I use something else?

I actually use a fine microfibre cloth (same as glasses-cleaning) to clean the filter. Make it damp if you need to.

It is advisable to put a UV/Haze filter over any lens you have and leave it there at all times. It does not have to be expensive and you do not have to be too cautious cleaning it. You can even use your finger or blow dust off. Large particles of dust might show of as large dark dots on the photos you take.

Because: Be careful about the lens’ original surface! It has a shimmering hard film on top that you should never scratch. Also, breathing upon the surface to moisten it is supposed to corrode it.



justmeandtheworld asked: Hi Mareen! What do you recommend me for cleaning a DSLR Camera. Any special brush or mini-vacuum? Thanks! :)

Hi José,

A lot of people have been asking this.

I clearly recommend not messing with the sensor. The first thing I turn off is the automatic sensor clean. It shakes the sensor, but at the same time, it can become staticy and attract more dust!

When I am aware of one big fuzzy thing on my sensor, I usually use air, as carefully as possible, but not from a container because it sometimes freezes.

I would never (again) touch the sensor myself with a cleaning device and alcohol. Because doing that, I have scratched a sensor before with a piece of dust that I was trying to remove.

So what I do is spend the extra money to get it done professionally by a camera store/dealer. Those Euros are saved when it takes much less time to retouch a photo because there are no dark spots in the image!



photojojo:

Wanna see what an iPhone 4S camera looks like *naked*? (omg rated R!)
It looks like this! Don’t you just wanna put a miniature camera body around it and throw it on your keychain?
This is What an iPhone 4S Camera Looks Like Under the Case
via Engadget

photojojo:

Wanna see what an iPhone 4S camera looks like *naked*? (omg rated R!)

It looks like this! Don’t you just wanna put a miniature camera body around it and throw it on your keychain?

This is What an iPhone 4S Camera Looks Like Under the Case

via Engadget



Anonymous asked: Hi Mareen,

(Oops, just posted this as a submission accidentally - sorry!)

Yes, I saw your blog post in McD and wondered: What are your preferred tools and method for cleaning a dSLR sensor and how nervous should I be about doing it (for the first time)?

(Love the blog, your work, and the nice "share and help people" attitude, by the way!)

Thanks - from Scott

Scott,

of course we were not cleaning the sensor there! I have a company (Calumet) do that every so often because I am aware and afraid of scratching the sensor.

What we did was put in a frame with lines, we attached it to the mirror, so that when I look through, I can take straight photos.

Thank you for your message and liking my work. If you want, you can become a facebook fan here: http://www.facebook.com/mareenfischinger

Have a good day :)

Mareen



What’s the ISO of an eye? It ranges between 25 and 60,000.

The Difference Between Your Eyes and a Camera

What’s the ISO of an eye? It ranges between 25 and 60,000.

The Difference Between Your Eyes and a Camera

(Source: photojojo)



photojojo:

LEFT: Normal photo  RIGHT: HDR-enhanced with iOS 4.1
Yesterday Apple introduced iPod Nanos that look like Shuffles, iPod Shuffles that look like pocket change, iTunes that looks like Facebook, and best of all…
HDR in the iPhone camera app.
Basically, when you’ve got bright light in part of your shot that would results in blown our highlights, you turn on HDR. The camera takes 3 shots instead of one, and combines them to preserve details in dark ares and bright areas.
From these early demo shots, Apple’s implementation looks to be subtle and well-done.
First look: HDR photos with Apple’s iOS 4.1 (AppleInsider)

photojojo:

LEFT: Normal photo  RIGHT: HDR-enhanced with iOS 4.1

Yesterday Apple introduced iPod Nanos that look like Shuffles, iPod Shuffles that look like pocket change, iTunes that looks like Facebook, and best of all…

HDR in the iPhone camera app.

Basically, when you’ve got bright light in part of your shot that would results in blown our highlights, you turn on HDR. The camera takes 3 shots instead of one, and combines them to preserve details in dark ares and bright areas.

From these early demo shots, Apple’s implementation looks to be subtle and well-done.

First look: HDR photos with Apple’s iOS 4.1 (AppleInsider)